Law School Personal Statement Tips | The Princeton Review

 

personal statement for law school

In your personal statement for law school you want to present yourself as intelligent, professional, mature and persuasive. These are the qualities that make a good lawyer, so they're the qualities that law schools seek in applicants. personal statement. application fee; any additional requirements unique to that particular school; Your undergraduate grade-point average (UGPA) and LSAT score are most predictive for success in law school and are fundamental for admission decisions. LSAT Score. Your LSAT score is an integral part of your law school application for most law. Mar 31,  · LAW SCHOOL ACTIVITIES: University of Chicago Law Review, Immigrant Child Advocacy Project Clinic, APALSA, Admissions Committee, Law School Film Festival I fell in love for the first time when I was four. That was the year my mother signed me up for piano lessons.


Personal Statement Examples - Sample Law School Personal Statements


Write a concise narrative with one or two points. Go for quality over quantity. Write about any activity that shows off your best qualities.

Review your classroom, student organization, work, and personal life for material. Well written statements use stories that illustrate your good qualities. You should not have to explicitly state them. If you are going to mention a law school concentration that interests you, you need to back up your interest by including details about experiences that led you to your interest. Focus on activities that have happened since you have been in college.

You are not only applying with graduating seniors but with alumni. Follow all statement instructions. Answer all prompts for information. Keep the focus on YOU, not an ill relative, remarkable client, or inner workings of an personal statement for law school where you worked.

Write several drafts and ask get feedback on early drafts. Don't use a quotation. If you want to express something that has been captured by a quote, say it in your own words. Do not manufacture drama—readers can tell when you are exaggerating or not being genuine.

Don't write about your philosophy on the law. For now, law school admissions officials are the law experts; you are the expert on YOU. You don't have to write personal statement for law school your interest in the law.

In fact, your statement will probably be more memorable if you don't! This statement is a critical sample of your ability to write, as well as an opportunity to tell the admissions committee about yourself. With so many applicants possessing identical qualifications, the statement can be the critical factor that distinguishes you from the applicant pool.

What you say in your statement can also help you offset weaknesses in your application. So, take writing the statement very seriously. Read the statement instructions carefully. Most schools are interested in learning what unique qualities and experiences you will contribute to their incoming class. For each activity, make a list of your duties, accomplishments, and other specifics, such length of commitment, name and contact information of related people, and so forth--anything that will remind you of your experiences.

Also, review your school transcripts and resume because you may want to address particular group projects you have participated in and courses you have completed in your personal statement.

Above all, follow the instructions given by each school. Each school will have their own instructions, so avoid writing a generic statement for all schools. Some schools will ask about your academic and personal background, work experience, activities, etc, personal statement for law school. Schools often seek information on matters that relate to their desire to have diverse student bodies. The development of an applicant's interest in law is a matter of concern to some schools but not to others.

In contrast, some schools request a writing sample on any subject of the writer's choice. As appropriate, tailor your statement for the school to which you are applying, but avoid emphasizing this over your experiences, attributes and goals. Weaknesses, such as a string of low grades or a low LSAT score should be addressed somewhere in your application, personal statement for law school. If clarifying weaknesses flows with your statement, you may use your statement to address them.

In either case, be brief and honest while offering a sympathetic explanation and assure the admissions committee that a similar weakness is unlikely to occur again.

Law schools use the personal statement to learn about your ability to write concisely, precisely, and well. The personal statement gives you an opportunity to showcase your abilities.

So, the best statements not only follow the schools' instructions, but are tied together by a theme and a logical progression of ideas, making good use of transitions.

They also employ perfect grammar and are written in a direct, simple style that avoids pretentious language. The best statements are not laundry lists of accomplishments and activities, but essays that describe a unique episode or two from your experience that demonstrate both your motivation for pursuing legal education along with positive, interesting aspects of your personality. We highly suggest that you have your statement reviewed by your letter of recommendation writers, and other friends, family members or peers who know your story well and possess excellent writing skills.

Some schools will explicitly state their word or page limit. Adhere to their wishes. You will not impress admissions committees with an overly long statement and your inability to follow directions. If no word count or page limit is stated, aim to write a statement that's about two pages long, double-spaced. Search form Search. How important is the personal statement? How do I get started? To get started, personal statement for law school, gather information about yourself including: Work, school and community experiences, such as positions you have held, volunteer opportunities, and projects you have participated in Extracurricular activities, such as clubs, sports teams, leadership positions Personal challenges and experiences, including travel, disabilities, goals you have accomplished Unique talents or interests For each activity, personal statement for law school, make a list of your duties, accomplishments, and other specifics, such length of commitment, name and contact information of related people, and so forth--anything that will remind you of your experiences.

What should I say in my personal statement? Should I use the personal statement to address weaknesses in my application? Does writing style count? How long should the statement be? Academic Preparation Personal statement for law school Timeline Applications.

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9 Important Personal Statement Tips for Law School Applicants

 

personal statement for law school

 

Mar 31,  · LAW SCHOOL ACTIVITIES: University of Chicago Law Review, Immigrant Child Advocacy Project Clinic, APALSA, Admissions Committee, Law School Film Festival I fell in love for the first time when I was four. That was the year my mother signed me up for piano lessons. “Personal statements for law school are the applicant’s opportunity to distinguish himself from hundreds of other applicants who have the same numbers, and the same major, and come from a similar school. The personal statement is an applicant’s opportunity to describe the distance they’ve come in their lives.”. May 05,  · Personal Statement about Legal Internships. The writer of this essay was admitted to every T14 law school from Columbia on down and matriculated at a top JD program with a large merit scholarship. Her LSAT score was below the median and her GPA was above the median of each school that accepted her. She was not a URM.