Excellent Law School Personal Statement Examples - 7Sage lsat

 

personal statement for law school example

Mar 31,  · Throughout this issue, countless examples show why we are so proud of the students at the law school. One might think that we get lucky that the students the admissions office chose for their academic accomplishments also turn out to be incredible members of . Crafting a Law School Personal Statement that Stands Out. Students are always asking how to write a personal statement for law school, particularly one that stands out from all the tebneriffas.tk all, advice from most universities is vague at best. Take this zinger from the University of Chicago: “Write about something personal, relevant, and completely individual to you. Examples of Personal Statements. Prepared by the Admissions Office. University of Toronto Faculty of Law. The Faculty of Law is committed to assisting students to make the best possible application to law school. s Below you will find examples of personal statements that were submitted by successful applicants to the JD Program in


9 Important Personal Statement Tips for Law School Applicants


The only common thread is sincerity. The authors did not write toward an imagined idea of what an admissions officer might be looking for: they reckoned honestly with formative experiences.

The writer of this personal statement matriculated at Georgetown. She was not a URM. When I came to, they were wheeling me away to the ER. That was the last time I went to the hospital for my neurology observership. Back at the drawing board, I reflected on my choices. The first time around, my primary concern was how I could stay in school for the longest amount of time possible.

Key factors were left out of my decision: I had no interest in medicine, no aptitude for the natural sciences, and, as it quickly became apparent, no stomach for sick patients. The second time around, I was honest with myself: I had no idea what I wanted to do.

At six months, I was one toothbrush short of living at our office. It was an unapologetic aquatic boot camp—and I liked it.

I wanted to swim. I remember my first client emergency. What am I going to do? I have enough confidence to set my aims high and know I can execute on them.

In the course of my advertising career, I have worked with many lawyers to navigate the murky waters of digital media and user privacy. Whereas most of my co-workers went to great lengths to avoid our legal team, I sought them out. The legal conversations about our daily work intrigued me.

How far could we go in negotiating our contracts to reflect changing definitions of an impression? What would happen if the US followed the EU and implemented wide-reaching data-protection laws? Working on the ad tech side of the industry, I had the data to target even the most niche audiences: politically-active Mormon Democrats for a political client; young, low-income pregnant women for a state government; millennials with mental health concerns in a campaign for suicide prevention.

The extent to which digital technology has evolved is astonishing. So is the fact that it has gone largely unregulated, personal statement for law school example. I hope to begin my next career at the intersection of those two worlds. The writer of this essay was admitted to every T14 law school from Columbia on down and matriculated at a top JD program with a large merit scholarship. Personal statement for law school example firm appeared to be falling apart.

The managing partners were suing each other, morale was low, and my boss, in an effort to maintain his client base, had instructed me neither to give any information to nor take any orders from other attorneys. I considered myself a competitive person and enjoyed the feeling of victory.

This, personal statement for law school example, though, was the kind of competition in which everyone lost. Although I felt discouraged about the legal field after this experience, I chose not to give up on the profession, and after reading a book that featured the U.

Shortly after, I received an offer to work at the office. For my first assignment, I attended a hearing in the federal courthouse. As I entered the magnificent twenty-third-floor courtroom, I felt the gravitas of the issue at hand: the sentencing of a terrorist. That sense personal statement for law school example gravitas never left me, and visiting the courtroom became my favorite part of the job.

Sitting in hearings amidst the polished brass fixtures and mahogany walls, watching attorneys in refined suits prosecute terror, cybercrime, and corruption, I felt part of a grand endeavor.

The spectacle enthralled me: a trial was like a combination of a theatrical performance and an athletic event. I sat on the edge of my seat and watched to see if good—my side—triumphed over evil—the defense.

Every conviction seemed like an unambiguous achievement. In my very first week, personal statement for law school example, I took the statement of a former high school classmate who had been charged with heroin possession.

I did not know him well in high school, but we both recognized one another and made small talk before starting the formal interview. He had fallen into drug abuse and had been convicted of petty theft several months earlier.

After finishing the interview, I wished him well. In that personal statement for law school example, where hundreds of people trudged through endless paperwork and long lines before they could even see a judge, there were no good guys and bad guys—just people trying to put their lives back together.

As I now plan on entering the legal profession—either as a prosecutor or public defender—I realize that my enthusiasm momentarily overwrote my empathy. The personal statement for law school example of this essay was offered significant merit aid packages from Cornell, Michigan, and Northwestern, and matriculated at NYU Law.

I resided in two worlds — one with fast motorcycles, heavy pollution, and the smell of street food lingering in the air; the other with trimmed grass, faint traces of perfume mingling with coffee in the mall, personal statement for law school example, and my mom pressing her hand against my window as she left for work. She was the only constant between these two worlds — flying me between Taiwan and America as she struggled to obtain a U.

My family reunited for good around my sixth birthday, when we flew back to Taiwan to join my dad. I forgot about the West, acquired a taste for Tangyuan, and became fast friends with the kids in my neighborhood. Other nights, she would turn off the TV, and speak to me about tradition and history — recounting my ancestors, life during the Japanese regime, raising my dad under martial law.

Along with the new language, I adopted a different way to dress, new mannerisms, and new tastes, including American pop culture. Whenever taxi drivers or waitresses asked where I was from, noting that I spoke Chinese with too much of an accent to be native, I told them I was American.

At home, I asked my mom to stop packing Taiwanese food for my lunch. The cheap food stalls I once enjoyed now embarrassed me. Instead, I wanted instant mashed potatoes and Kraft mac and cheese.

The open atmosphere of my university, where ideas and feelings were exchanged freely, felt familiar and welcoming, but cultural references often escaped me. Unlike them, I missed the sound of motorcycles whizzing by my window on quiet nights. It was during this time of uncertainty that I found my place through literature, discovering Taiye Selasi, Edward Said, and Primo Levi, whose works about origin and personhood reshaped my conception of my own identity.

Their usage of the language of otherness provided me with the vocabulary I had long sought, and revealed that I had too simplistic an understanding of who I was, personal statement for law school example. By idealizing the latter and rejecting the former, I had reduced the richness of my worlds to caricatures. Just as I once reconciled my Eastern and Western identities, I now seek to reconcile my love of literature with my desire to effect tangible change.

I first became interested in law on my study abroad program, when I visited the English courts as a tourist. As I watched the barristers deliver their statements, it occurred to me that law and literature have some similarities: both are a form of criticism that depends on close reading, the synthesis of disparate intellectual frameworks, and careful argumentation. Through my subsequent internships and my current job, I discovered that legal work possessed a tangibility I found lacking in literature.

I hope to harness my critical abilities to reach beyond the pages personal statement for law school example the books I love and make meaningful change in the real world. The writer of this essay was admitted to her top choice—a T14 school—with a handwritten note from the dean that praised her personal statement.

I had been with Mark the day before he passed, exactly one week before we were both set to move down to Tennessee to start our freshman year of college. I spent Christmas Day trying to act as normally as possible, hiding the news in order not to ruin the holiday for the rest of my family. This pattern of loss compounding loss affected me more than I ever thought it would. Eventually, I shut down emotionally and lost interest in the world—stopped attending social gatherings, personal statement for law school example, stopped talking to anyone, and stopped going to many of my classes, as every day was a struggle to get out of bed.

I had been interested in bodybuilding since high school, but during this time, personal statement for law school example, the lowest period of my life, it changed from a simple hobby to a necessity and, quite possibly, a lifesaver. The gym was the one place I could escape my own mind, where I could replace feelings of emptiness with the feeling of my heart pounding, lungs exploding, and blood flooding my muscles, where—with sweat pouring off my forehead and calloused palms clenched around cold steel—I could see clearly again.

Not only did my workouts provide me with an outlet for all of my suppressed emotion, but they also became the one aspect of my life where I felt I was still in control. I knew that if it was Monday, no matter what else was going on, I was going to be working out my legs, and I knew exactly what exercises I was going to do, and how many repetitions I was going to perform, and how much weight I was going to use for each repetition.

I knew exactly when I would be eating and exactly how many grams of each food source I would ingest. I knew how many calories I would get from each of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats.

My routine was one thing I could count on. As I loaded more plates onto the barbell, I grew stronger mentally personal statement for law school example well. It was the healing I did there that left me ready to move on. One of the fundamental principles of weightlifting involves progressively overloading the muscles by taking them to complete failure, personal statement for law school example, coming back, and performing past the point where you last failed, consistently making small increases over time.

The writer of this essay was accepted to many top law schools and matriculated at Columbia. My rapist was my eighth-grade boyfriend, who was already practicing with the high school football team.

He assaulted me in his suburban house in New Jersey, while his mom cooked us dinner in the next room, in the back of an empty movie theatre, on the couch in my basement. It started when I was thirteen and so excited to have my first real boyfriend. He was a football player from a different school who had a pierced ear and played the guitar. I, a shy, slightly chubby girl with a bad haircut and very few friends, felt wanted, needed, and possibly loved.

The abuse—the verbal and physical harassment that eventually turned sexual—was just something that happened in grown-up relationships. This is what good girlfriends do, I thought. They say yes. Never having had a sex-ed class in my life, it took personal statement for law school example several months after my eighth-grade graduation and my entry into high school to realize the full extent of what he did to me.

This was something that happened in a Lifetime movie, not in a small town in New Jersey in his childhood twin bed. As I grew older, I was confronted by the fact that rape is not a surreal misfortune or a Lifetime movie. Rape is real. I am beyond tired of the silence. Personal statement for law school example took me personal statement for law school example years to talk about what happened to me, to come clean to my peers and become a model of what it means to speak about something that society tells you not to speak about.

I trained to staff a peer-to-peer emergency hotline for survivors of sexual assault. This past summer, I traveled to a country notorious for sexual violence and helped lay the groundwork for a health center that will allow personal statement for law school example to receive maternal care, personal statement for law school example, mental health counseling, and career counseling. Law school is going to help me take my advocacy to the next personal statement for law school example.

 

Law Personal Statement Examples | tebneriffas.tk

 

personal statement for law school example

 

The first “before” and “after” pair is a general law school personal statement. The second “before” and “after” pair is a law school application diversity statement. The third pair is a response to the question “Why do you want to attend Duke Law?”. May 05,  · Personal Statement about Legal Internships. The writer of this essay was admitted to every T14 law school from Columbia on down and matriculated at a top JD program with a large merit scholarship. Her LSAT score was below the median and her GPA was above the median of each school that accepted her. She was not a URM. Crafting a Law School Personal Statement that Stands Out. Students are always asking how to write a personal statement for law school, particularly one that stands out from all the tebneriffas.tk all, advice from most universities is vague at best. Take this zinger from the University of Chicago: “Write about something personal, relevant, and completely individual to you.